Ceramics

Ceramics

The Sardinian tradition of ceramics dates back to ancient times, but precise documentation on this production can only be found starting from the 17th century. The largest and most complex ceramic production developed in the zone of Oristano, in decorative forms that were then applied to the architecture: gargoyles, set on the cornices of the gutters of the local houses, served to drain water from the roofs, in the style of Roman or Pompeian houses. These gargoyles were glazed after firing, taking on bright and luminous colours and reflections, differently from the Roman ones made of unglazed terracotta. The modern production of ceramics is characterised by a single original matrix that characterises its style, unique in spirit and technique. The majority of the objects produced have a specifically utilitarian use, but there are also some objects of purely decorative art, such as bas-reliefs or figurative vases. The most important example is the Vaso di Oristano, with a statuette of Eleonora d’Arborea at the top. This production area still offers, though with a limited production, an interesting and high quality product.